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Audience is Undergraduate upper division 15-16
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View Resource Effects of frost on wildflowers: an unexpected consequence of climate change--image 15 of 22

Photo of an early-stage inflorescence of tall larkspur (Delphinium barbeyi) after a mid-June snowstorm at the Rocky Mountain Biological Laboratory. The buds were killed by the cold temperature. Like ...

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View Resource Effects of frost on wildflowers: an unexpected consequence of climate change--image 17 of 22

The glacier lily (Erythronium grandiflorum) is one of the earliest wildflowers to bloom after snowmelt in the Rocky Mountains. Its ovaries and seeds are sensitive to late-season frosts. But...

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View Resource Effects of frost on wildflowers: an unexpected consequence of climate change--image 18 of 22

A queen bumble bee (Bombus bifarius) foraging for nectar on a flower of Erythronium grandiflorum (glacier lily). This flower has frost-sensitive ovaries. Bumble bee queens and hummingbirds are...

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View Resource Effects of frost on wildflowers: an unexpected consequence of climate change--image 19 of 22

Example of a frost-killed ovary (on left) and a normally developing fruit (on right) of Erythonium grandiflorum, the glacier lily. The two plants were selected to show the difference, and weren't...

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View Resource Effects of frost on wildflowers: an unexpected consequence of climate change--image 10 of 22

The number of flowers produced by the aspen sunflower (Helianthella quinquenervis) in a particular year is affected by the date of the start of the growing season, which is in turn influenced by the...

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