Skip Navigation

EcoEdDL

Home Browse Resources Submission Instructions About Help Advanced Search

Investigating the footprint of climate change on phenology and ecological interactions in north-central North America

The ecological questions in this exercise are:
1) Have long-term temperatures changed throughout Ohio? 2) How will these temperature changes impact plant and animal phenology, ecological interactions, and, as a result, species diversity?

This exercise is designed to give students experience working with large datasets and to allow them to use real ecological data to evaluate long-term temperature change and its impacts on flowering phenology, pollinator emergence and arrival phenology, and emergent trophic mismatches. The students use several data sets for this activity; long-term temperature records from the U.S. Historical Climatology Network (USHCN, Menne et al. 2010), flowering phenology data from Calinger et al. (2013), and pollinator arrival and emergence time data from Ledneva et al. (2004).
Cumulative Rating: This resource has a 4.5 star rating (based on 2 responses)
Format
Resource Group QUBES
Resource Group Link http://ecoed.esa.org/index.php?P=AdvancedSearch&Q=Y&FK=QUBES&RP=5&SR=...
Primary or BEN resource type
Secondary resource type
General Biology Core Concepts
Discipline Specific Core Concepts
Life science discipline (subject)
Keywords TIEE, Climate change, phenology, pollinators, trophic mismatch, species diversity, arrival time, mutualism
Audience
Intended End User Role
Language
Educational Language
Pedagogical Use Description Students will be able to:

- Produce and analyze graphs of temperature change using large, long-term data sets (Synthesis, Analysis)
- Develop methods for calculating species-specific shifts in flowering time with temperature increase (Synthesis)
- Use these methods to calculate flowering shifts in six plant species (Application)
- Describe the ecological consequences of shifting plant and animal phenology (Comprehension)
- Understand how interactions between species as well as with their abiotic environment affect community structure and species diversity (Knowledge, Comprehension)
- Evaluate data “cherry-picking” as a climate change skeptic tactic (Evaluation)
Primary Author Controlled Name
Primary Author Affiliation The Ohio State University
Primary Author email kcalinger@gmail.com
Submitter Name Teresa Mourad
Submitter Email teresa@esa.org
Rights Copyright is held by Kellen M. Calinger
Date Of Record Submission 2014-05-27

Resource Comments

Subject: Comment On: Investigating the footprint of climate change on phenology and ecological interactions in north-central North America
Posted By: tmourad
Date Posted: 2016-06-16 11:23:17
See posts by Elizabeth Perkin at
https://qubeshub.org/collections/post/1475

https://qubeshub.org/collections/post/1320
Subject: Comment On: Investigating the footprint of climate change on phenology and ecological interactions in north-central North America
Posted By: dgrise
Date Posted: 2016-05-26 13:49:05
Used this module in a dual-credit intro biology lab course and it worked very well. Resources to implement this module can be found at: https://qubeshub.org/collections/post/1488
Subject: Comment On: Investigating the footprint of climate change on phenology and ecological interactions in north-central North America
Posted By: jrmays
Date Posted: 2016-05-26 10:54:21
I implemented this module as part of a major's biology course at Gaston College (2-year community college). Students complete the modules over 2 lab periods. I used a pre-activity excel tutorial provided by Calinger, implemented the module unmodified, and then followed up the module with my own supplemental critical analysis activity. You can view the activity and my instructor notes here:

https://qubeshub.org/collections/post/1504
Subject: Comment On: Investigating the footprint of climate change on phenology and ecological interactions in north-central North America
Posted By: carriekissman
Date Posted: 2016-05-24 12:49:20
I incorporated the TIEE Phenology and Climate Change Module as part of a 4 lab period Phenology Project in my 2nd semester Majors Introductory Biology Course. The course had 5 sections each with 20-24 students; lab duration is 2 hours. My students learned about phenology and climate change and used the HHMI Excel Tutorials in a previous lab period. It took 2 lab periods (4 hours) to introduce line/scatterplot graphing and linear trend lines and regression and to complete the full module. My 5 Week Campus Migratory Bird Phenology Project, Modified TIEE Module Notes and homework assignment can be found at:

https://qubeshub.org/collections/post/1491/comment
Subject: Comment On: Investigating the footprint of climate change on phenology and ecological interactions in north-central North America
Posted By: psaunder
Date Posted: 2016-05-24 08:31:45
I slightly modified the phenology lab for a general education biology course for non-science majors. I also used related activities before and after the lab. My instructor notes and related resources and assignments are posted here: https://qubeshub.org/collections/post/1490

This message was edited by psaunder on May 24, 2016 at 8:33 am.

Subject: Comment On: Investigating the footprint of climate change on phenology and ecological interactions in north-central North America
Posted By: doverath
Date Posted: 2016-05-23 15:04:31
I used a very slightly modified version of this module in a intro biology section reserved for majors. We started in lecture with a "pre-lab" Excel activity and then moved into the module, which we completed in the 2 hour and 50 minute lab period that followed the lecture (after a brief lunch break). My instructor notes and classroom materials are posted at: : https://qubeshub.org/collections/post/1488.
Subject: Comment On: Investigating the footprint of climate change on phenology and ecological interactions in north-central North America
Posted By: KByrne
Date Posted: 2016-05-22 20:06:12
I used a modified version of this activity for a 3 hour lab in my first year ecology/evolution course for biology majors. Students had been using excel for data analysis all term, so I did not have to scaffold the material too much. However, I found the activity a little long for a 3 hour lab, so I shortened it. You can find my modified version of the activity here: https://qubeshub.org/collections/post/1480
Subject: Comment On: Investigating the footprint of climate change on phenology and ecological interactions in north-central North America
Posted By: Bibit
Date Posted: 2016-05-19 18:45:15
I used this module in a majors introductory biology course. It worked really well and helped students to gain skills in data analysis and critical thinking. You can access my teacher notes and the modified handout for the activity here: https://qubeshub.org/collections/post/1468

This message was edited by Bibit on May 23, 2016 at 2:22 pm.

Subject: Comment On: Investigating the footprint of climate change on phenology and ecological interactions in north-central North America
Posted By: JosephineRodriguez
Date Posted: 2016-05-19 14:11:00
This module was implemented in a 1st year course (lab) designed for majors, but is also an option for non-majors to fulfill general education requirements. Before we started the lab, a PPT on linear regression and basic statistical analyses in Excel was presented (that PPT is available in this Collection). I then gave this brief PPT on phenology and I introduced the module. The entire module fit in a single 4 hour lab period with most students taking 3.5 hours to finish.

The link to this PPT is here:
https://qubeshub.org/collections/post/1466

This message was edited by tmourad on June 16, 2016 at 11:18 am.

Subject: Comment On: Investigating the footprint of climate change on phenology and ecological interactions in north-central North America
Posted By: steinweg
Date Posted: 2016-05-18 09:41:54
I enjoyed using this module in my introductory biology course for majors. The goal of the course is to get students to explore how scientists "do science." I used this module to work on graphing skills and data interpretation. The students and I both loved this module. During the wrap up at the end the students were engaged and asking good questions that connected previous material in the course to this module.
You can view my instructor notes and lecture timeline at https://qubeshub.org/collections/post/1462/

This message was edited by tmourad on June 16, 2016 at 11:19 am.

Subject: Comment On: Investigating the footprint of climate change on phenology and ecological interactions in north-central North America
Posted By: mbakermans1
Date Posted: 2016-05-17 20:30:24
This module was great to use in an introductory Biology class (Biodiversity) for majors. I broke this module up into multiple assignments and added an assignment before and after the module components. These modifications allowed this set of assignments to be used in a group project setting for an entire term while pulling in concepts from the other parts of the class. This course did not have a lab component so most of these assignments were out of class work for the groups.

You can view my modifications and supplemental materials here: https://qubeshub.org/collections/post/1461

This message was edited by mbakermans1 on May 20, 2016 at 1:25 pm.

Subject: Comment On: Investigating the footprint of climate change on phenology and ecological interactions in north-central North America
Posted By: jav6e
Date Posted: 2016-05-09 11:00:48
A biologist and I (mathematician) co-taught this module in our Biological Diversity Lab at a small liberal arts college. Most of the students were freshman with only about half biology majors. Our Lab sections consist of 1 hour a pre-lab lecture and 3 hours of actual lab. We used this in two sections for a total of about 30 students. We lectured for about 45 minutes and then it took the students around 2 hours 45 minutes to complete the module questions. We also used the Bald Eagle Population Dynamics TIEE module in our lab after teaching this module. I think that worked very well because the quantitative material required for the Bald Eagle lab built nicely on the material need for this lab. I would not suggest using the Bald Eagle module first and then this lab.

I put together a PowerPoint presentation with a quantitative review that can be accessed using the link
https://qubeshub.org/collections/post/1453/

This message was edited by tmourad on June 16, 2016 at 11:20 am.

Log In:





OR