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Issues in Ecology, Issue 05: Biotic Invasions

This report is an introduction to exotic species invasions. An exotic species becomes invasive, when it proliferates unchecked across the region in which it was introduced. The transformation from immigrant to invader and how humans act as dispersal agents is explained. Attributes of invaders, effects on native community, global ecological and economic consequences, prevention, and long term strategies for control and eradication are listed. Recommendations on future research and changes in policy are also made. Issues in Ecology is an ongoing series of reports designed to present major ecological issues in an easy-to-read manner. This Issue summarizes the consensus of a panel of scientific experts based on the information that was current and available at the time of its publication in 2000.
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Format
Resource Group This resource is part of ESA's Issues in Ecology series.
Resource Group Link http://www.esa.org/ecoed/index.php?P=AdvancedSearch&Q=Y&F1=%22Issues+...
Primary or BEN resource type
Secondary resource type
Discipline Specific Core Concepts
Life science discipline (subject)
Keywords Epidemiology, Dispersal agents, Invasives, Biotic constraints, Vacant niches, Community species richness, Disturbance, Immigration, Global change, report
Audience
Intended End User Role
Language
Educational Language
Pedagogical Use Description This report can be used for general information, classroom reading and discussion, and as a springboard for more information research. The report illustrates applications of ecology as it relates to our society and environment.
Url http://www.esa.org/science_resources/issues_ecology.php
Primary Author Controlled Name
Primary Author Affiliation School of Biological Sciences, Washington State University

Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of Tennessee

CSIRO Entomology and CRC for Weed Management Systems

CABI BIOSCIENCE, UK Centre (Ascot)

School of Biological Sciences, University of Auckland

Biological Laboratories, Harvard University
Primary Author email n/a
Rights Copyright 2008 by Richard N. Mack, Chair, Daniel Simberloff, W. Mark Lonsdale, Harry Evans, Michael Clout, Fakhri Bazzaz, and the Ecological Society of America
Date Of Record Submission 2008-01-10

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