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Pathways to Scientific Teaching, Chapter 7b of 7: Coding to analyze students’ critical thinking

Using a problem developed from Guinotte et al. [attached], we illustrate a research approach to determine the effectiveness of inquiry-based instruction on students’ understanding. Two research studies, one in biology (Udovic et al. 2002) and one in chemistry (Wright et al.1998), influenced our thinking about how to proceed. Both are exemplary studies that examined the impact of active learning and cooperative groups on student learning by comparing reformed courses to traditional existing courses. The studies coded and analyzed students’ written and oral responses to determine their understanding. Udovic et al. (2002) concluded that students in the reformed course showed significant gains in conceptual learning, scientific reasoning, and attitudes about science; Wright et al. (1998) concluded that students in the reformed course demonstrated higher-level critical thinking skills in oral assessments given by faculty external to the course.
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Resource Group "Pathways to Scientific Teaching" is based on a series of two-page articles published in "Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment" from August 2004 to June 2006 that illustrated effective instructional methods to help students gain conceptual understanding in ecology (Diane Ebert-May and Janet Hodder, 2008).

This installment of the Pathways to Scientific Teaching series describes one or more instructional strategies that use scientific papers to teach selected concepts. While specific journal articles are used in demonstrating these strategies, we would like to emphasize that each activity in the Pathways series has been designed for use with any scientific article on a similar topic, and not just the example shown here.

Note that in addition to undergraduate faculty, many high school teachers can use these articles as well in their biology courses.
Resource Group Link http://ecoed.esa.org/index.php?P=AdvancedSearch&Q=Y&FK=%22Pathways+to...
Primary or BEN resource type
Secondary resource type
Discipline Specific Core Concepts
Life science discipline (subject)
Keywords scleractinian corals, stony corals, seawater chemistry, coding, fossil fuel
Audience
Intended End User Role
Language
Educational Language
Pedagogical Use Description Faculty research outcomes: 1) Classify student responses for comprehension and critical thinking. 2) Code assessment data to provide a basis for asking questions about students’ understanding.

This installment of the Pathways to Scientific Teaching series describes one or more instructional strategies that use scientific papers to teach selected concepts. While specific journal articles are used in demonstrating these strategies, we would like to emphasize that each activity in the Pathways series has been designed for use with any scientific article on a similar topic, and not just the example shown here.

Note that in addition to undergraduate faculty, many high school teachers can use these articles as well in their biology courses.
Primary Author Controlled Name
Primary Author Affiliation Michigan State University
Primary Author email ebertmay@msu.edu
Secondary Author Name(s) Janet Hodder 1, and Janet Batzli 3
Secondary Author Affiliation(s) 1 University of Oregon, 3 University of Wisconsin
Rights Copyright 2008, the Ecological Society of America
Date Of Record Submission 2011-12-05

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