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Searched for: "Effects of frost on wildflowers: an unexpected consequence of climate change"
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View Resource Effects of frost on wildflowers: an unexpected consequence of climate change [resource group]

A collection of slides about the effects of frost on Colorado wildflowers at the Rocky Mountain Biological Laboratory (RMBL). RMBL is a high-altitude field research station at 9,500 feet in the...

View Resource Effects of frost on wildflowers: an unexpected consequence of climate change--image 02 of 22

An example of a late spring frost and snow event at the Rocky Mountain Biological Laboratory (RMBL), at 9,500 feet in the Colorado Rocky Mountains. This photograph was taken on 13 June 2001, when the...

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View Resource Effects of frost on wildflowers: an unexpected consequence of climate change--image 21 of 22

A graph (modified from Boggs and Inouye 2012, Ecology Letters) demonstrating that Speyeria mormonia (Mormon fritillary) butterfly visits are proportionally greater when their food plant, Erigeron...

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View Resource Effects of frost on wildflowers: an unexpected consequence of climate change--image 13 of 22

Delphinium barbeyi, or tall larkspur, flowering in a year with no frost damage. Photographed (by David Inouye) in front of Gothic Mountain, at the Rocky Mountain Biological Laboratory. Altitude about...

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View Resource Effects of frost on wildflowers: an unexpected consequence of climate change--image 20 of 22

A Mormon fritillary butterfly (Speyeria mormonia) visiting flowers of the fleabane daisy (Erigeron speciosus), an important and preferred nectar resource. Flower buds of E. speciosus are...

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View Resource Effects of frost on wildflowers: an unexpected consequence of climate change--image 14 of 22

A female broad-tailed hummingbird (Selasphorus platycercus) in Colorado visiting tall larkspur (Delphinium barbeyi). The hummingbirds migrate north from Mexico each spring. Larkspurs serve as an...

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View Resource Effects of frost on wildflowers: an unexpected consequence of climate change--image 04 of 22

A graphical representation of a frost event at the Rocky Mountain Biological Laboratory (Colorado). The temperature dipped to 25.1 F on 11 June 2004. Winter snowpack melted at the monitoring...

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View Resource Effects of frost on wildflowers: an unexpected consequence of climate change--image 03 of 22

Date of winter snowpack melt during the past 36 years at Rocky Mountain Biological Laboratory. A trend toward earlier snowmelt was noted during the study period, though the correlation was not...

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View Resource Effects of frost on wildflowers: an unexpected consequence of climate change--image 01 of 22

A view of the Rocky Mountain Biological Laboratory, a high-altitude field research station at 9,500 feet in the Colorado Rocky Mountains. RMBL has supported field work since it was founded in 1928,...

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View Resource Effects of frost on wildflowers: an unexpected consequence of climate change--image 09 of 22

A graph of the number of unfrosted flowers of the aspen sunflower (Helianthella quinquenervis) from an annual count in a 10x45m plot at the Rocky Mountain Biological Laboratory, Gothic, Colorado, by...

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View Resource Effects of frost on wildflowers: an unexpected consequence of climate change--image 15 of 22

Photo of an early-stage inflorescence of tall larkspur (Delphinium barbeyi) after a mid-June snowstorm at the Rocky Mountain Biological Laboratory. The buds were killed by the cold temperature. Like ...

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View Resource Effects of frost on wildflowers: an unexpected consequence of climate change--image 12 of 22

Excavated plants of Helianthella quinquenervis (aspen sunflower, Asteraceae). H. quinquenervis is a long-lived perennial (some individuals can live 50-75 years). Note that each plant has multiple...

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View Resource Effects of frost on wildflowers: an unexpected consequence of climate change--image 18 of 22

A queen bumble bee (Bombus bifarius) foraging for nectar on a flower of Erythronium grandiflorum (glacier lily). This flower has frost-sensitive ovaries. Bumble bee queens and hummingbirds are...

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View Resource Effects of frost on wildflowers: an unexpected consequence of climate change--image 19 of 22

Example of a frost-killed ovary (on left) and a normally developing fruit (on right) of Erythonium grandiflorum, the glacier lily. The two plants were selected to show the difference, and weren't...

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View Resource Effects of frost on wildflowers: an unexpected consequence of climate change--image 10 of 22

The number of flowers produced by the aspen sunflower (Helianthella quinquenervis) in a particular year is affected by the date of the start of the growing season, which is in turn influenced by the...

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View Resource Effects of frost on wildflowers: an unexpected consequence of climate change--image 06 of 22

Ants (Formica obscuripes) searching for extrafloral nectar on the involucral bracts around a flower head in bud in the frost-sensitive herb Helianthella quinquenervis. The ants help to deter...

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View Resource Effects of frost on wildflowers: an unexpected consequence of climate change--image 17 of 22

The glacier lily (Erythronium grandiflorum) is one of the earliest wildflowers to bloom after snowmelt in the Rocky Mountains. Its ovaries and seeds are sensitive to late-season frosts. But...

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View Resource Effects of frost on wildflowers: an unexpected consequence of climate change--image 16 of 22

Buds of Delphinium barbeyi (tall larkspur, Ranunculaceae) killed by a late season frost. In those years, the larkspur suffers reproductive failure, affecting animal species that rely on them for...

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View Resource Effects of frost on wildflowers: an unexpected consequence of climate change--image 11 of 22

Results of a demographic study of Helianthella quinquenervis (aspen sunflower, Asteraceae) within plots at 2,900m at the Rocky Mountain Biological Laboratory. Note that seedlings are not common in...

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View Resource Effects of frost on wildflowers: an unexpected consequence of climate change--image 08 of 22

Photo of a meadow with thousands of Helianthella quinquenervis (aspen sunflower, Asteraceae) plants. In the year that this photo was taken, a springtime frost killed all but a few flower buds....

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View Resource Effects of frost on wildflowers: an unexpected consequence of climate change--image 07 of 22

A meadow with thousands of plants of Helianthella quinquenervis (aspen sunflower, Asteraceae) at peak bloom. This species is a common long-lived perennial plant in meadows near the Rocky Mountain...

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View Resource Effects of frost on wildflowers: an unexpected consequence of climate change--image 22 of 22

The ratio of flowers/butterfly (Erigeron speciosus to Speyeria mormonia) in year t is a good predictor of the change in the size of the Mormon fritillary butterfly population from year t to the next...

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View Resource Effects of frost on wildflowers: an unexpected consequence of climate change--image 05 of 22

A flowering plant of Helianthella quinquenervis (aspen sunflower, Asteraceae) at the Rocky Mountain Biological Laboratory(RMBL). This species has flower buds that are frost-sensitive. The plants have...

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